MAD MEAT GENIUS

MAD MEAT GENIUS
Chilebrown at home

Barbeque

Barbeque
Let's get Cookin!!!

Monday, June 28, 2010

KOBE BRISKET EXPERIENCE

(Kobe on right)
Harry Stewart, the owner of 'The Great American Barbeque, serves some award winning barbeque. Harry competes in numerous barbeque competitions and has been quite successful accumulating awards. When Harry mentioned he served Kobe-style beef brisket at his restaurant, I began to drool with anticipation of tasting this exotic bovine. Kobe beef generally means a cut of meat from the Wagyu breed of cattle. This beef is renowned for its flavor, tenderness, and fatty well marbled texture. In Japan according to popular belief the Wagyu cattle receive one beer per day and are massaged with warm sake. Today's Kobe beef was from the Masami ranch located near Redding California.


Harry does not serve the Kobe brisket all the time. We called and arranged a time he would be serving this special beef. We wanted to compare and taste the Kobe side by side with some regular brisket. Kobe beef is graded above the 'Prime, Choice, Select" grades. Harry explained this beef was rated 'Kobe Supreme 10". This regular brisket was no chump. It had a pretty impressive pedigree itself of USDA Choice grade Black Angus. This will be a battle of two heavy hitters.


Both briskets were smoked for 15 hours, flavored and fueled by oak wood. They were both rubbed with a dry rub. Harry mentioned the Kobe was rubbed with a sweeter rub because it is a sweeter meat. They were both pulled out of the smoker and place on the cutting board. (Kobe is positioned on the left of the image.) You will notice the Wagyu does not have a distinctive flat and point shape of the regular brisket. Harry took a wickedly sharp knife and began to carve. Both of these brisket oozed with juices of flavor. I wanted to take a straw and suck the cutting board.

Now for the verdict. The Kobe was so very tender with a beef flavor that had a hint of sweetness. If you place a bite in your mouth and closed your eyes, the beefy rich flavor will take you on joy ride of meat pleasure. How did the regular brisket compare to the Kobe? This Black Angus was also on the tender juicy love train of beef flavor. It may have been a tad less tender and maybe not as sweet, but would be a stellar and superior meal on its own. I would like to give credit to Harry for smoking both these cuts of beef to maximize the flavor and bring out the tenderness.

(Kobe on bottom)

Was the Kobe superior to the regular brisket? This would be a close call. The Kobe beef cost twice as much as the regular. The Kobe-style may have a subtle difference of sweetness and texture from the Black Angus. I am declaring a tie. The Kobe is something that I would recommend to experience. Harry has worked magic with both of these cuts of meat and I would recommend both. What a beefy day!

The Great American Barbeque

8 comments:

Zoomie said...

OMG, I love that huge black smoker - looks like the Darth Vader of smokers. Must try this place, next time I'm down to Baron's for a freezer refill.

Chilebrown said...

Zoomie, You will not be dissapointed. If you get a chance order the dinasour bones and peach cobbler too.

Zoomie said...

Are you serious? Dinosaur bones? Sounds like fun!

highlandsranchfoodie said...

Interesting that you declared a tie! By the way, I've never even known anyone who's even eaten Kobe. Great post.

Chris said...

I missed out when George did a waygu brisket at Dead End BBQ but plan to be there next time. But I also know from your review that I'll wait until he does his before I spend the $$ on doing one myself :)

Chilebrown said...

Zoomie, Yes

highlandsranchfoodie,The differences were subtle. The price was not. Harry serves great barbeque

Chris, I actually want to cook one myself but am also hesitant because of cost.

My Kitchen in the Rockies said...

Have you ever looked into how these poor animals are kept that end up on your plate as Kobe beef?
It is sickening!
"The animals were kept in some kind of crate, so there could be very little movement. They were very dirty from their own manure—and I know a dirty cow from a clean cow. It was disgusting, such a contradiction from what I’d read.”
Read the full article:
http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/2000s/2007/12/kobe_beef_estabrook

Chilebrown said...

My Kitchen in the Rockies, Thanks for stopping by. You know I do not like war and brussel sprouts. They eat dogs in China you know. Oh well!